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Housing

Providing safe temporary housing for LGBTQI asylum seekers in the UK

countries criminalise homosexuality

LGB people have claimed asylum in the UK since 2015 (The Home Office)

the number of bed nights provided by Micro Rainbow every year

Why we run safe houses dedicated solely to LGBTQI asylum seekers and refugees

In 67 countries homosexuality is illegal. 1,500 LGBTQI asylum seekers from those countries come to the UK every year.

When they come to the UK they are still not safe. Because of their sexuality, gender identity, gender expression or intersex status they often:

  • are abused in asylum seeker accommodation by other people seeking asylum who often come from the same countries they are escaping from
  • become homeless and depressed
  • are rejected by their ethnic community and live in poverty

What we are doing to help LGBTQI asylum seekers and refugees

Micro Rainbow opened the first safe house in the United Kingdom dedicated solely to LGBTQI asylum seekers. Our houses provide a safe and temporary shelter for all LGBTQI asylum seekers. They are located in the London area, in the North West and in the West Midlands.

We also provide moving on services as well as various social inclusion programmes.

Awards

Credit: Thomson Reuters Foundation News

The story of Micro Rainbow's housing programme

We opened our first safe house for LGBTQI asylum seekers in 2017 - read on to find out why we started and why it is so important.

Success stories

Democratic Republic of the Congo street

Eric’s Story

Eric knew that if he stayed in the DRC, he would either kill himself or be killed. So, he made the heart-breaking decision to leave behind everything he knew – his loved ones, his career and his identity – to begin a new life in the UK.

Latest updates

National Coming Out Day 2023

National Coming Out Day 2023

This National Coming Out Day, we explore the harsh reality of ‘coming out’ or ‘being outed’ for our community.

Lesbian Visibility Week 2023

Lesbian Visibility Week

For Lesbian Visibility Week 2023 we spoke to Grace, a lesbian from Cameroon living in a Micro Rainbow safe house.

Help us keep the lights on for the LGBTQI refugees living in our housing this winter: become a Micro Rainbow ally!

Cost of living campaign

Become an ally today to help Micro Rainbow support LGBTQI refugees through the cost of living crisis.

Democratic Republic of the Congo street

Eric’s Story

Eric knew that if he stayed in the DRC, he would either kill himself or be killed. So, he made the heart-breaking decision to leave behind everything he knew – his loved ones, his career and his identity – to begin a new life in the UK.

Trans Flag

Celebrating Trans Day of Remembrance

To celebrate Trans Day of Remembrance 2020, Micro Rainbow board member Alana Eissa has highlighted the specific challenges trans asylum seekers and refugees must face in the UK.

Rainbow lanterns

The Invisible Women

On the occasion of International Women’s Week, Micro Rainbow announces a project dedicated to supporting LBTI asylum seeking and refugee women.

Rainbow bars

From detention to Micro Rainbow’s housing

Issues faced by LGBTQI migrants in UK detention centres and how Micro Rainbow could be an Alternative to Detention (ATD) for many people who are at risk of violence and abuse.

Lady with a gold lamp

June’s story

This is the story of June, a lesbian from China who was trafficked into the UK and is now hoping to gain asylum.

Alana

Alana’s story

Alana shares her experience of leaving her own country, claiming asylum in the UK, finding safety with Micro Rainbow’s housing and moving on to a bright future.

Rainbow Hands

Kaira and Muhammed’s stories

Success stories of Kaira, an intersex asylum seeker from a Latin American country and Muhammed, a gay asylum seeker from Bangladesh

Cataleya in a MRI home

Cataleya’s story

From sleeping rough on the streets of London to finally finding safety in an Micro Rainbow safe house

Group dance workshop

Suffering in silence – the invisibility of LGBTQI refugees

On World Refugee Day, we wrote a blog for Amnesty International LGBTQI Network. We discussed the invisibility of LGBTQI asylum seekers and refugees and challenges they continue to face including discrimination, isolation, poverty and homelessness.